Syria - If we dont have oil
  • The United Nations (hereinafter UN) affirms that as of 14 October more than 3,000 people have been killed in Syria. On 4 of October 2011, the Security Council gathered to discuss the issue. The US, the UK, France, Germany and Portugal proposed a resolution which was vetoed by China and Russia. The media refer to the veto as a diplomatic rebuff to the West. However, a deeper analysis demonstrates that there has been more than a simple rejection of Western values.
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Syria - If we dont have oil

3,000 PEOPLE KILLED IN SYRIA UPRISING: WHY HAVE THE BRICS COUNTRIES TURNED A BLIND EYE TO THE SITUATION?

The United Nations (hereinafter UN) affirms that as of 14 October more than 3,000 people have been killed in Syria.[1] On 4 of October 2011, the Security Council gathered to discuss the issue. The US, the UK, France, Germany and Portugal proposed a resolution which was vetoed by China and Russia. The media refer to … Continue reading

Sri Lankan asylum seekers after their boat broke down in Indonesia. They were on the way to Australia's Christmas Island. (Oscar Siagian/Getty Images)

Misinformation and the politics of fear: the asylum debate in Australia

SPECIAL GUEST POST FROM FRIEND OF HUMAN RIGHTS FORUM, STEVE PHILLIPS. STEVE IS CURRENTLY A MASTER STUDENT OF INTERNATIONAL HUMAN RIGHTS LAW AT ÅBO AKADEMI.   Both externally and internally, Australia prides itself on its strong human rights record and its standing as a good global citizen; however, deeper analysis shows a country that has … Continue reading

Photo: Marina Lourenço

World Refugee Day: The need for a more equitable burden-sharing in refugee protection

SPECIAL GUEST POST FROM FRIEND OF HUMAN RIGHTS FORUM, MARINA LOURENÇO. MARINA IS CURRENTLY A MASTER STUDENT OF INTERNATIONAL HUMAN RIGHTS LAW AT ÅBO AKADEMI. It has already been some time since other voices started to call the world’s attention to the fact that developing countries are bearing a much heavier burden in refugee protection … Continue reading

Judges of the European court of human rights arrive at the beginning of a hearing. Photograph: Vincent Kessler/Reuters

Short Note: An unfair judgment on the European court of human rights

The Guardian released today an interesting article called:  “An unfair judgment on the European court of human rights”. The article discusses that, far from threatening national sovereignty, the Court is a catalyst speeding up existing movements for change. It is also interesting to see that the article mentions  issues that have been recently examined in this … Continue reading

Freedom of Religion and the Dutch Political Context

SPECIAL GUEST POST FROM FRIEND OF HUMAN RIGHTS FORUM, SILVIE ZONDERLAND. SILVIE IS CURRENTLY AN INTERN AT THE EQUAL TREATMENT COMMITTEE IN THE NETHERLANDS. (Obviously, the views expressed in this post are those of the author and do not necessarily reflect those of the Equal Treatment Committee) On March 15, 2011, Dutch liberal politician Jeanine … Continue reading

expressala

Short note: Expresa.la

Expresa.la is a new website with videos, blogs, cases, papers and virtual courses about human rights in Latin America. The idea of the website is to gather professors, students, lawyers to discuss relevant  themes about human rights in Latin America. They have videos from Boaventura de Sousa Santos, Roberto Gargarella, César Rodrígues Garavito and many other … Continue reading

BIN LADEN

Bin Laden is dead. Torture is still wrong.

As US President Barack Obama enjoys the bump in his approval rating following the death of Osama Bin Laden, his Republican counterparts are clamouring for a piece of the credit and in doing so, they have rekindled the debate over whether the use of harsh interrogation techniques (or torture, to most of us) is justified. … Continue reading

uniceflandmine

Side Note: The UNICEF Landmine Stickers

A small, but extremely effective way of drawing attention to an important issue. These self adhesive stickers are nearly invisible when placed on the floor. Once a passer-by steps on one it will stick to the sole of their shoe. Once they attempt to remove it they are confronted with the image of a landmine … Continue reading

Image: BBC

A Tale of Two Courts – Part three: The Track of a Storm

As I mentioned in the previous post the Grand Chamber overturned the earlier decision. The decision of the Grand Chamber was, however, quite contradictory. The Court considered that “the crucifix is above all a religious symbol. The domestic courts came to the same conclusion and in any event the Government have not contested this. The … Continue reading

Image: Guardian

A Tale of Two Courts – Part two: The Reactions to the Lautsi v. Italy Chamber Judgment

As I said in the previous post, it seems evident that there is a violation of the right to freedom of religion in the Lautsi case. Primary education is compulsory in Italy; therefore the kids are exposed daily to a religious symbol that can be against their beliefs. It is important to remember that the … Continue reading