Short Note: An unfair judgment on the European court of human rights

The Guardian released today an interesting article called:  “An unfair judgment on the European court of human rights”. The article discusses that, far from threatening national sovereignty, the Court is a catalyst speeding up existing movements for change. It is also interesting to see that the article mentions  issues that have been recently examined in this … Continue reading

A Tale of Two Courts – Part three: The Track of a Storm

As I mentioned in the previous post the Grand Chamber overturned the earlier decision. The decision of the Grand Chamber was, however, quite contradictory. The Court considered that “the crucifix is above all a religious symbol. The domestic courts came to the same conclusion and in any event the Government have not contested this. The … Continue reading

A Tale of Two Courts – Part two: The Reactions to the Lautsi v. Italy Chamber Judgment

As I said in the previous post, it seems evident that there is a violation of the right to freedom of religion in the Lautsi case. Primary education is compulsory in Italy; therefore the kids are exposed daily to a religious symbol that can be against their beliefs. It is important to remember that the … Continue reading

A Tale of Two Courts – Part One: Understanding Lautsi v. Italy

“It was the best of times, it was the worst of times, it was the age of wisdom, it was the age of foolishness, it was the epoch of belief, it was the epoch of incredulity, it was the season of Light, it was the season of Darkness, it was the spring of hope, it … Continue reading

Build a mosque, burn a bridge?

It is with great regret that I write this first entry not with hope for a brighter future, but rather with fear of a societal regression. The controversy that has erupted over the proposed construction of an Islamic community centre in the vicinity of Ground Zero in New York risks pushing us back into the … Continue reading